MENOPAUSE

A general overview of the Word MENOPAUSE

Menopause occurs when a woman hasn’t menstruated in 12 consecutive months and can no longer become pregnant naturally. It usually begins between the ages of 45 and 55, but can develop before or after this age range.When does menopause begin in a woman

Menopause can cause uncomfortable symptoms, such as hot flashes and weight gain. For most women, medical treatment isn’t needed for menopause.

When does menopause begin and how long does it last?

Most women first begin developing menopause symptoms about four years before their last period. Symptoms often continue until about four years after a woman’s last period.
A small number of women experience menopause symptoms for up to a decade before menopause actually occurs, and 1 in 10 women experience menopausal symptoms for 12 years following their last period.

The median age for menopause is 51, though it may occur on average up to two years earlier for African-American and Latina women. More studies are needed to understand the onset of menopause for non-Caucasian women. When does menopause begin in a woman

There are many factors that help determine when you’ll begin menopause, including genetics and ovary health. Perimenopause occurs before menopause. Perimenopause is a time when your hormones begin to change in preparation for menopause.

It can last anywhere from a few months to several years. Many women begin perimenopause at some point after their mid-40s. Other women skip perimenopause and enter menopause suddenly.

About 1 percent of women begin menopause before the age of 40, which is called premature menopause or primary ovarian insufficiency. About 5 percent of women undergo menopause between the ages of 40 and 45. This is referred to as early menopause. When does menopause begin in a woman

What are the symptoms of menopause?

Every woman’s menopause experience is unique. Symptoms are usually more severe when menopause occurs suddenly or over a shorter period of time.
Conditions that impact the health of the ovary, like cancer or hysterectomy, or certain lifestyle choices, like smoking, tend to increase the severity and duration of symptoms.

Aside from menstruation changes, the symptoms of perimenopause, menopause, and postmenopause are generally the same. The most common early signs of perimenopause are:

  • Less frequent menstruation
  • Heavier or lighter periods than you normally experience
  • Vasomotor symptoms, including hot flashes, night sweats, and flushing

Recent research has proven that An estimated 75 percent of women experience hot flashes with menopause.

Complication.

Menopause usually has complications that can occur. Common complications of menopause include:

  • Vulvovaginal atrophy
  • Dyspareunia, or painful intercourse
  • Slower metabolic function
  • Osteoporosis, or weaker bones with reduced mass and strength
  • Mood or sudden emotional changes
  • Cataracts

And many more. there is a big question that we always as our self about menopause which is

What is the cause of MENOPAUSE

It’s worth talking with your healthcare provider if you’re experiencing troublesome or disabling menopause symptoms, or you’re experiencing menopause symptoms and are 45 years of age or younger.
A new blood test known as the PicoAMH Elisa diagnostic test was recently approved by the Food and Drug AdministrationTrusted Source. This test is used to help determine whether a woman has entered menopause or is getting close to entering menopause.

This new test may be helpful to women who show symptoms of perimenopause, which can also have adverse health impacts. Early menopause is associated with a higher risk of osteoporosis and fracture, heart disease, cognitive changes, vaginal changes and loss of libido, and mood changes.
Your doctor can also order a blood test that will measure the level of certain hormones in the blood, usually FSH, and a form of estrogen called estradiol.

Consistently elevated FSH blood levels of 30 mIU/mL or higher, combined with a lack of menstruation for one consecutive year, is usually confirmation of menopause. Saliva tests and over-the-counter (OTC) urine tests are also available, but they’re unreliable and expensive.

During perimenopause, FSH and estrogen levels fluctuate daily, so most healthcare providers will diagnose this condition based on symptoms, medical history, and menstrual information.
Depending on your symptoms and health history, your healthcare provider may also order additional blood tests to help rule out other underlying conditions that may be responsible for your symptoms.

Additional blood tests commonly used to help confirm menopause include:

  • Thyroid function tests
  • Blood lipid profile
  • Liver function tests
  • Kidney function tests
  • Testosterone, progesterone, prolactin, estradiol, and chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) tests

The Treatment of Menopause

You may need treatment if your symptoms are severe or affecting your quality of life. Hormone therapy may be an effective treatment in women under the age of 60, or within 10 years of menopause onset, for the reduction or management of:

Hot flashes
Night sweats
Flushing
Vaginal atrophy
Osteoporosis

Other medications may be used to treat more specific menopause symptoms, like hair loss and vaginal dryness.

The central advanced pharmacy provides medications with or without prescription. delivery is within 24/ depending on the location. get your health checked.

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